Mechanics made Easy

Turn Order

Preface

To better explain the FATE mechanics for people who don't understand them, this page has been created. While one view is that implementing the FATE system will make things 'overly complicated' and having various stats limits player actions. The counter-view is that not having a system leads to either no limits (as players will not restrict themselves), and that the FATE system actually simplifies things such as: turn order, skill strength, combat, health.

To best demonstrate the FATE system in action, we will be using a character that most people are familiar with:

Example Character

Player: Steve Burton
Name: Cloud Strife
Race: Human
Description: An amnesiac mercenary with a giant sword, likes money and hates Shinra.
High Concept: ex-SOLDIER
Trouble:

  • Faulty Memory - Cloud occasionally breaks down when he realizes the events in his past don't add up.

Aspects:

  • Project S - Cloud is unintentionally drawn to others with JENOVA cells in their body.
  • AVALANCHE - Cloud is obligated to stop Shinra whenever he can.
  • First Class SOLDIER - Cloud is fairly intimidating because of his past.

Approaches:
Careful: +1
Clever: +0
Flashy: +2
Forceful: +3
Quick: +2
Sneaky: +1

Stunts:

  • Limit Break - After sustaining an injury, Cloud uses an attack, that if successful has successes equal to the level of injury.

(This does not remove injuries, and resets the progress on Limit Break)

Gear Bonuses:
Buster Sword: +1 Forceful when used for offense in combat.

Health:
Mild (2): -, -, -
Moderate (4): -, -
Severe (6): -
Stress: 000

Example Actions

Now that we have our example character, Cloud; we need him to be useful in a variety of situations. This is done using creative solutions and playing him to his strong suits.

Example Action 1:

The switch to the door is broken, and nobody in the group knows how to fix it.

  1. Cloud: Cloud attempts to open the door by cutting it down with his sword.
  2. The GM (internally) rules that this approach is forceful.
  3. The GM (or player) rolls their fudge dice, which has it's total added to the relevant aspect (forceful).
  4. The Roll is +++o (3)
  5. The GM then compares the boosted forceful (6) against what he determines to be the defense of the door (4) and it's stress (2)
  6. The GM describes the effect Cloud's attack had on the door.
  7. GM: Because the door has been reduced to 0 stress, it is destroyed by Cloud's attack.

This approach is good, because it plays off Cloud's strengths; that being said, it barely worked; other solutions may be more useful depending on the situation.

Example Action 2:

Cloud needs to get into the HoneyBee inn/brothel, but has no membership card.

  1. Aerith: I dress Cloud up as a girl since he has those effeminate good looks.
  2. Cloud: Cloud reluctantly dresses and acts as a girl to get in.
  3. The GM (internally) rules that this approach is sneaky.
  4. The GM (or player) rolls their fudge dice, which has it's total added to the relevant aspect (sneaky).
  5. The Roll is +++o (3)
  6. The GM then compares the boosted sneaky (4) against what he determines to be the relevant check from the guard (5; Clever 5, —++)
  7. The GM describes the effect Cloud's attack had on the guard.
  8. GM: The guard isn't convinced that Cloud is a girl, and snickered a bit.
  9. Aerith: I pay the guard 200 gil to let us in.
  10. GM: He lets you in, still smirking to himself.

This approach is poor, because Cloud isn't a sneaky character; however now that he's 'in', he can either drop the disguise or continue trying to make it work.

Example Combat 1

A squad of Shinra MPs enter the reactor in pursuit of AVALANCHE, realizing their target split up, they do the same. A single Shinra MP catches Cloud in a corridor.

  1. GM: The MP thinks he knows Cloud and hesitates, giving Cloud the first chance to attack.
  2. Cloud: Cloud charges in with his Buster Sword and slashes at the guard.
  3. The GM (internally) rules that this approach is forceful.
  4. The GM (or player) rolls their fudge dice, which has it's total added to the relevant aspect (forceful); in addition Cloud's equipment adds to his value by +1 in this situation.
  5. The Roll is ++-o (2), with an extra 1 from the sword. (3)
  6. GM: The MP holds up his rifle to try and block the sword.
  7. The GM (internally) rules that this approach is forceful.
  8. The GM rolls their fudge dice, which has it's total added to the relevant aspect (forceful)
  9. The guard only had 1 forceful to start with, and the roll of —-+ has rendered it to 0 (values cannot be negative)
  10. NPCS have no way to distribute damage like players do, and take it directly to their stress; 2 stress - 3 damage = -1 remaining stress
  11. The GM describes the effect Cloud's attack had on the MP.
  12. GM: Cloud's slash easily cuts through not only the MP's rifle, but his flesh; the man didn't stand a chance and dies instantly.
Example Combat 2

Shinra's Vice President, Rufus, now the President, was waiting for Cloud on the roof of Shinra's headquarters.

  1. GM: Already in wait for Cloud; Rufus politely greets Cloud with a shotgun blast in his direction.
  2. The GM (internally) rules that this approach is sneaky.
  3. The GM rolls their fudge dice, which has it's total added to the relevant aspect (sneaky).
  4. Cloud: Cloud tries to roll behind some cover!
  5. The GM (internally) rules that this approach is careful (though it could have also been quick, depending on the GM's interpretation).
  6. The GM (or player) rolls their fudge dice, which has it's total added to the relevant aspect (careful).
  7. For the purposes of this example, we're going to say that after Rufus's attack, Cloud was informed he needs to take 3 damage.
  8. Cloud's player now has a choice: Divide the 3 damage among injuries (a single rank 2 injury, and 1 stress); or take it directly to stress.
  9. Cloud: (Cloud takes a mild consequence and one point of stress to alleviate the damage.)
  10. Cloud: Cloud's roll pulled a muscle in his back, his sword is heavy after all.

Taking a consequence can keep your character in the game, if Cloud lost all 3 stress right away; he'd be in the 'downed' condition, with Rufus having free shots at him if he so chose; you only get 3 milds, 2 moderate and 1 severe slot.
Before an opponent's turn (during yours) you can 'give in', which allows you to have some say in what happens to your character despite having lost a fight; that being said, your allies can still win for you.

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